Where did it all go so wrong?

I would like to think that these are the writings from a fictional place such as the Hunger Games universe, but sadly it is all too real….

randommusingsbynobodyimportant

When my children first started school, I didn’t expect to find myself here – that one who rants all the time, that one who constantly reposts diatribes about the primary education system on Facebook when people probably just want to see pictures of their friends’ dogs and nice dinners out, that one who can’t shut up about the damage its all doing. To be honest, I didn’t give it much thought. I thought they’d go to school, and they’d enjoy it, and it would all be much like it was when I went to school. I remember primary school as fun. That’s it. I know we did work, but I don’t remember any pressure, or anyone ever mentioning a target, and I don’t remember a single formal test. Probably we had them, but the memories are lost in a haze of all the other days – when I learned and…

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Where did it all go so wrong?

The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Schools. Or “Of Course It’s Bloody Privatisation”

Disappointed Idealist

This week, Nicky “I’m not Michael Gove, Honest” Morgan and her chum George “I’m not Satan, Honest” Osborne, announced that every school in England would be forced to become an academy by 2022. This has proved, to put it mildly, a little controversial. Opponents of academization, both forced and unforced, have generated a petition of more than 100,000 signatures already, while unions, teachers, politicians and Mumsnet(!) have united in fairly vitriolic opposition. Even Tristram Hunt and David Blunkett came out against this, which tells a remarkable story in itself. However, the “Glob“, as Francis Gilbert termed the very vocal and influential minority who actively support Gove’s privatisation agenda, has been predictably active too. More chaff has been thrown out by supporters of this policy in the last week than the RAF chucked out of its bombers over Germany in 1944, and all with the same intent: to obscure…

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The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Schools. Or “Of Course It’s Bloody Privatisation”

Unit 8 Application of applied science Key words

Hypothesis

A hypothesis is a statement that clearly states what a scientist expects to happen in an investigation, it is based on scientific theory.

Examples of hypothesis

Scientists have recently discovered a link between eating processed meat (bacon and sausages for example) and an increased risk of bowel cancer.

They could have made two different kinds of hypothesis

Qualitative hypothesis

Eating more processed meat will increase the risk of developing bowel cancer

This describes what they expect to find WITHOUT using any numbers

Quantitative hypothesis

Eating more than six portions of processed meat in a week will increase the risk of developing bowel cancer by more than 15%

This describes what they expect to happen using numbers

What happens if a hypothesis goes wrong?

Sometimes a scientist can be testing a hypothesis and they discover that their hypothesis is incorrect.

Many scientific breakthroughs have been made after a hypothesis has turned out to be incorrect, scientists develop new and original theories to explain their new ideas and knowledge increases as a result. If the new hypothesis is correct, the newly developed theory quickly becomes established by the scientific community.

 

 

Unit 8 Application of applied science Key words

The needs of our children – and how they’re getting lost

As I spend more and more time getting more and more depressed about the ideology that Nicky Morgan and her cronies are bringing back, there is hope in that there are good teachers out there who share the concerns and worries that and the sausage machine that our precious young children are having to be processed through.

Please stop meddling, and de-politicise education!

randommusingsbynobodyimportant

Tonight I find myself unexpectedly emotional. I couldn’t tell you exactly why – it could be that last week I spent the majority of my children’s waking hours at work, in meetings, on theatre trips, and planning things for other people’s children. It could be that it has become clear that despite all my hopes that child 1’s fine motor issues could be resolved, dealt with, made disappear, it is now clear that this is probably not the case, and he will be coping with it for the rest of his school life. It could be that the government’s plans for tougher tests for seven year olds has made me, more than ever before, realise that I don’t want my children to be part of an education system in which the government insist on testing small children for no reason other than to force the school to show their progress…

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The needs of our children – and how they’re getting lost

Dear Mr Cameron – can we talk about what exactly you’re doing to our education system?

This is a very very painful read…

randommusingsbynobodyimportant

Dear Mr Cameron,

I’m jumping on the bandwagon here a little – I suspect the internet is awash with posts from devastated, tearful teachers, despairing over the thought of another five years of teaching under a Conservative government. I say five, but thanks to Scotland, you’re probably there to stay. And you seem like a nice man and everything – all those cute photocalls with your children and tremendously capable wife – and very efficient at running the country in lots of ways. But you’re ruining education. You’re creeping back to a frighteningly elitist, assessment-heavy, mind numbingly tedious system in which we will spend our time testing children on things I’m not really sure they need to know, and I certainly don’t think they need to know at the age your education advisors have arbitrarily decided on, and preparing all but the very brightest for a life of failure. At…

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Dear Mr Cameron – can we talk about what exactly you’re doing to our education system?

Mediocre Failures

Disappointed Idealist

My children are adopted. They were adopted at the ages of three, four and six. As with nearly all children adopted in this country over the last couple of decades, this means that their early life experiences were pretty terrible. As each was born, their collective experience of life became more damaging, as their circumstances worsened. So the eldest is least affected as her first years were perhaps less difficult experiences, while the youngest is most affected, as her entire first two years of life were appalling. I’m not going to go into detail here about their specific early life experiences, but if you want to read up on the sort of effects which can result from serious neglect or abuse, then you could read this .

Why am I writing this ? Especially now after midnight in the middle of the Easter holidays ? It’s because I’m so angry I…

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Mediocre Failures

Are you a Rich Tea or a Hobnob?

I’ve watch Ms Dweck many times and struggle to stay focussed.

Talking about Teaching

Unknown-1

So, today was a first.  I gave my first inset session to my peers.  I don’t know why, but standing in front of 30 students in a class, or 200 students in a hall is fine, but give me a group of 15 members of staff and it is another matter.  To say I was a little nervous is an understatement – but fortunately, my audience were forgiving and no-one fell asleep, or walked out of either of my 25 minute presentations.  I’m writing this blog for those members of staff who didn’t come to see me today; to give a flavour of the presentation that I gave.

Background: Growth Mindset & Resilience

Over the last year or so, I have been following the Growth Mindset journey of quite a few schools including Huntingdon School and Durrington School amongst others.  It began to resonate with me, but in particular, I…

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Are you a Rich Tea or a Hobnob?

Style over substance?

Some interesting ideas and style over substance ideas to look at.

Thanks for increasing my vocabulary too…

Talking about Teaching

20140420-085120.jpg

I have four children, aged 10 – 18. That means that I have had 54 opportunities to make birthday cakes. I’m ashamed to say that when my 12 year old asked for a smarties cake and they didn’t sell one in Sainsburys, Tesco Asda or online; I did, this year, make my first ever birthday cake! I was so proud of it. It was wowed over by everyone who saw it. I posted a picture on Facebook and was very proud! That was, until H cut one slice and the whole thing disintegrated. It was held together by chocolate fingers, ribbon and loads of fudge icing! Definitely, style over substance.

So, what has this got to do with my teaching?
This post is about my failures. Times when I have focused more on the presentation (the icing and chocolate fingers) than the cake itself. It covers my journey to making…

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Style over substance?